lindsay ellis
lindsay ellis video essay
lindsay ellis authorial intent
lindsay ellis death of the author

Death of the Author

1/01/2019
दृश्य 801 511
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What is brand can never die.
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Sources:
Baillie, Katie. “JK Rowling Says Lupin's Condition Is 'a Metaphor Illnesses with a Stigma'.” Metro, Associated Newspapers Limited , 12 Sept. 2016, metro.co.uk/2016/09/09/jk-rowling-says-remus-lupins-condition-as-a-werewolf-is-a-metaphor-for-hiv-and-aids-6118903/.
Carey, Tanith. “The 'Sick-Lit' Books Aimed at Children: It's a Disturbing Phenomenon. Tales of Teenage Cancer, Self-Harm and Suicide...” The Daily Mail, Associated Newspapers Ltd., 3 Jan. 2013, www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2256356/The-sick-lit-books-aimed-children-Its-disturbing-phenomenon-Tales-teenage-cancer-self-harm-suicide-.html?fbclid=IwAR34ncjXSmMyIFivwUIWdxwui4r1U_XSnfFAVfHS5-2n_egZCUK5Vl8e2Io.
Crowley, Laura. “‘The Fault in Our Stars’ Exploits Human Suffering.” The Bucknellian, The Bucknellian, 17 Apr. 2013, bucknellian.blogs.bucknell.edu/2013/04/17/the-fault-in-our-stars-exploits-human-suffering/.
Green, John. The Fault in Our Stars. Dutton Books, 2012.
Green, John. “Questions about The Fault in Our Stars (SPOILERS!).” John Green Books, John Green, 2 Aug 2012, www.johngreenbooks.com/questions-about-the-fault-in-our-stars-spoilers
Guarino, Morgan. “35 Major Life Facts According To Nick Miller.” The Odyssey Online, Odyssey Media Group, Inc, 20 Mar. 2017, www.theodysseyonline.com/35-life-facts-according-to-nick-miller.
Rice, Anne. “Anne's Messages to Fans.” Anne Rice the Official Site, Anne Rice, 14 Sept. 2009, annerice.com/ReaderInteraction-MessagesToFans.html.
@jk_rowling (J.K. Rowling). “Canon: brown eyes, frizzy hair and very clever. White skin was never specified. Rowling loves black Hermione 😘” Twitter, 21 Dec 2015, 5:41 AM, twitter.com/jk_rowling/status/678888094339366914?lang=en
Shoger, Scott. “John Green: Novelist, Vlogger, Force for Good.” NUVO, NUVO.net, 30 May 2014, www.nuvo.net/arts/written_spoken_word/john-green-novelist-vlogger-force-for-good/article_49103d8f-7cd1-5830-afd3-66abfd7fd22f.html.
Sarah Z. JK Rowling and Authorial Intent. IN-top, IN-top, 12 Nov 2018, in-top.org/ok/%E0%A4%B5%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%A1%E0%A4%BF%E0%A4%AF%E0%A5%8B-A6qJXLNL8Ik.html
Vlogbrothers. I Love Hank: Esther Day 2010. IN-top, IN-top, 2 Aug 2010, in-top.org/ok/%E0%A4%B5%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%A1%E0%A4%BF%E0%A4%AF%E0%A5%8B-ixr4YISTmck.html.
Vlogbrothers. Rest In Awesome, Esther. IN-top, IN-top, 27 Aug 2010, in-top.org/ok/%E0%A4%B5%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%A1%E0%A4%BF%E0%A4%AF%E0%A5%8B-Mj96HM9kDTQ.html.
Vlogbrothers. With Esther. IN-top, IN-top, 5 July 2010, in-top.org/ok/%E0%A4%B5%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%A1%E0%A4%BF%E0%A4%AF%E0%A5%8B-7DKrs3IngoE.html.
Waldman, Katy. “John Green Is a Hero of the Teen Internet. Is He to Blame for the Controversy Around Him?” Slate Magazine, The Slate Group LLC, 7 July 2015, slate.com/culture/2015/07/john-green-author-of-paper-towns-and-the-fault-in-our-stars-is-the-most-loved-and-hated-person-on-the-teen-internet.html?fbclid=IwAR1LjjINnt1tq8IiFuUVa8klFsHqij8zdfvpZ3GNPJJwIoOvLg9G8CpVPfE.
Ward, Hollie. “The Death of John Green.” On The Scene Magazine, On The Scene, 6 Feb. 2016, onthescenemag.co.uk/the-death-of-john-green.
Waters, Darren. “Entertainment | Rowling Backs Potter Fan Fiction.” BBC News, BBC, 27 May 2004, news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/3753001.stm.
Willette , Jeanne. “Michel Foucault: ‘What Is an Author?".” Art History Unstuffed, Art History Unstuffed, 24 Jan. 2014, arthistoryunstuffed.com/michel-foucault-what-author/.

Lindsay Ellis
Lindsay Ellis
टिप्पणियाँ
  • vlogbrothers

    vlogbrothers

    9 महीने पहले

    Hi! Lindsay, thank you for inviting me to be part of this video. I really enjoyed the video and the nuanced take on a very difficult subject. I wanted to clarify one thing I've seen in comments: I don't think the video implied it, but just to be clear: The Fault in Our Stars is not, like, fanfic about a real person. I started writing The Fault in Our Stars many years before I even met Esther. My friendship with Esther definitely informed the story especially in thinking about Hazel and Van Houten, but Hazel is not Esther (Hazel isn't Gus, either, for that matter.) Esther's own story was published by her family in a brilliant book called This Star Won't Go Out, which I recommend. Anyway, I know that the author appearing in comments in a video about death of the author is too many layers of meta, but here we are in 2019. -John

    • Snarf McDreary

      Snarf McDreary

      15 दिन पहले

      I really dislike this idea of "death of the author". I am a reader; I have not created the books, I have not written the text, I merely consume them. I can have my own reading, yes; but without the author and his/her ideas, it would not have been written. The author is the single most important part about the text since, without the author, it would not be here, it would not exist. If I were to say that a text belongs to me, even though I do not have written it, would mean - to me - the highest form of narcissism and egocentrism. It always seemed to me like an idea of critics that wanted to feel more important than the actual producer of a work.

    • Salene Brom

      Salene Brom

      3 महीने पहले

      Blondie Wise 😲

    • Joseph Neira

      Joseph Neira

      3 महीने पहले

      "Author is dead" is just post-modern, relativistic bullsh*t. The author's intent should ALWAYS dominate every other intent, even if his/her intent is inferior to the fan's intent. Societies embrace of "Death of the Author" can be traced back to a bratty culture in which everyone wants their own worldview affirmed in everything they look at.

    • Blondie Wise

      Blondie Wise

      4 महीने पहले

      I was about to say how AART was in the back! Dftba

    • holaCarolina

      holaCarolina

      4 महीने पहले

      I read Looking for Alaska not knowing who John Green was. I didn't like it, and avoided your other book because I just didn't like how "sick" all of it felt. I found something really wrong with all that "become an adult so you can die" narrative and, at the time, I had quite a cynical attitude towards stories that romaticed being sick. My peers loved it and compared it to "A walk to remember". Out of curiosity I read snippets, but...I just couldn't. Then the movie came out and I couldn't bring myself to watch it. I was an adult by then, and it all felt too dreamlike. I found out who you (John) really are because I liked one of Hank's videos 🤷🏻‍♀️. So yeah...after listening to you on IN-top, I might give your books another chance. But not the movie, I'm not ready for that.

  • Rose Okello

    Rose Okello

    11 घंटे पहले

    To reveal art and conceal the artist is art’s aim - Oscar Wilde

  • Not Sure who's on first

    Not Sure who's on first

    22 घंटे पहले

    Jk Rowling: if you need to explain your intent outside the text then you obviously failed as an artist (assuming you are being sincere) that applies to everything (or most things) paratextual. I agree however that you can't fully divorce paratext or your knowledge, understanding, impression or even opinion of an author from the text. I certainly don't begrudge john's desire/choice to be somewhat public (fulfilling for him) nor Salinger for being reclusive. You do you boo. I think they both understand/understood that will influence people's experience and interpretation of their work. Even avoiding public exposure creates a mystique of reclusiveness; hiding your person from the world ironically creates a persona in people's minds. There's no escaping it. So authors should feel free to live and discuss whatever they want openly or to avoid that. But commenting on the meaning of your own work? Am I being old fashioned? I was taught in college that's why you workshop writing. The final product should come as close as possible to communicating what you want to communicate, regardless of how you define that - thematically, socially, emotionally - or how decided or ambiguous/ambivalent you want to be in that. Yeah, I am old fashioned. Any writer has goals whether to communicate ideas, pose questions, make people think, feel or laugh or even confuse or irritate people at times. Just like a joke, if you have to explain it afterwards you failed.

  • danielr82

    danielr82

    दिन पहले

    @13:32 "Lets not get into a big debate about "The international Market" and why this was a good business decision"
    inserted at a point criticizing authors who go back and "add intent" or "control their universe" after the fact... :)

  • Gmackematix

    Gmackematix

    2 दिन पहले

    SPOILER! In fact everything that follows in life is paratext which will affect how you experience anything you read, view, listen to in the future. All is spoilers.

  • Jeroen Putzeys

    Jeroen Putzeys

    3 दिन पहले

    Love your channel.

  • Mr. Starch

    Mr. Starch

    3 दिन पहले

    "Iffy :/"
    The most loaded sideways mouth emoji usage of all time

  • Matthew Fodell

    Matthew Fodell

    4 दिन पहले

    I don’t understand the conflict people see between authorial intent and deriving or creating the meaning you personally take from a text... You can have your own interpretation and it can be legitimate without claiming the author’s intent doesn’t matter... The author’s intended meaning is one thing, a reader’s interpretation is another thing. If you personally hate the post-scriptual amendments Rowling adds to Harry Potter then don’t think about them... They are objectively something the author added later on, but if acknowledging them as part of the story would screw up your experience of the books then just ignore them and interpret the books in isolation.
    I would never say authorial intent “doesn’t matter.” It “matters” as much or as little as any other aspect of a story... It is just one objective fact about the book, just like the letter of the text, just like the cover art, just like the inspirations for aspects of the story... No more, no less. If an author has an intention for a character or plot device or setting then that intention is there, but ultimately your experience and interpretation of the book is subjective. The question shouldn’t be whether authorial intent matters— it’s whether it matters to you, whether it’s relevant to the type of analysis/interpretation you are doing. As you said at the start, the question is whether death of the author is right for you. We can talk about a very strict, “fundamentalist” interpretation down to the letter of the text, or we can look at every bit of information we have to contextualize the text, from interviews to explanations of authorial intent, to official artwork. Or we can give what Curio refers to as an “aggressive reading” (I’m not a literary criticism/analysis student so I don’t know if there’s a formal term for it), imposing our own meaning, even if it is pretty clearly not what the author intended. These will all yield different results, but the results just are what they are. I don’t think it makes sense to consider any of them as “more important,” or “more right...” They are all potentially applicable, significant, and interesting in the right context. And I say this as someone who philosophically tends pretty heavily towards in many respects modernism (albeit with some atypical characteristics due to the fact that I borrow good ideas from wherever I find them). Looking from the outside, it appears as though historically literary academics have formed these camps, and then argue on behalf of their camp against the validity of the other camps. But, as is very often the case in academia and elsewhere, it seems to me that the correct answer is that it’s not an either/or— this very polemical style of discourse creates a false dichotomy. It seems the same as the nature versus nurture debate. There are not diametrically opposed, mutually exclusive alternatives... They are two sides of the same coin, fragments of a theory which is incomplete until i accounts for or includes both pieces of the whole. I see this in metaphysical materialism vs traditional, subjective idealism (I’m an objective idealist), I see it in the conflict between Marxism and anarchism (you could say I’m a libertarian Marxist, but I draw heavy influence from both Marxism and anarchism), the presented opposition between the Democratic and Republican parties (when they are aligned as representatives of the interests of capital, financed by many of the same people, arguably with more unifying them at core than distinguishes them in social issues)... It’s a reoccurring theme that I think becomes very pronounced when you analyze things through a dialectical lens, and perhaps even most so through a nondualistic or “polar” lens (personally I think these go hand in hand).
    Anyway, very interesting stuff! Just stumbled upon you, Curio, and Renegade Cut, and you all have been re-igniting my interest in media analysis and taking a more in-depth look at literature that I may have taken for granted in the past. You pull a lot of meaning and thought-provoking insight from subjects and texts in which I wouldn’t expect to look for it.

  • Hungry Hedgehog

    Hungry Hedgehog

    4 दिन पहले

    Remember when we lost tumblr post editing?

  • I do stuff with movies and maybe tv shows

    I do stuff with movies and maybe tv shows

    5 दिन पहले

    Have you read fight club?

  • Headphone Guy

    Headphone Guy

    6 दिन पहले

    If everything J.K. Rowling says outside of the books is canon, then _My Immortal_ is canon.

  • dustinb42

    dustinb42

    7 दिन पहले

    Maybe this is just me, but does Lindsey look super hot as an early 90s instructional video personality?

  • LookingGlassProject

    LookingGlassProject

    8 दिन पहले

    Anne Rice can go fuck herself, I'm going to write yaoi fanfiction.

  • Mrpersonman0

    Mrpersonman0

    8 दिन पहले

    Lindsay: _"...You have no control over when you will die"_
    Me: Oh yes I do!
    **
    My ghost: Ha- wait...

  • Noah Wilson

    Noah Wilson

    8 दिन पहले

    Best video

  • Ripbooboo

    Ripbooboo

    9 दिन पहले

    Infinite Jest

  • Adam Mack

    Adam Mack

    9 दिन पहले

    Hehe you can tell shes loving this

  • Nadia Bhatti

    Nadia Bhatti

    10 दिन पहले

    kind of hard to read famous and legendary texts without thinking about its' legend when the legend precedes it and is the reason you are reading it in the first place. Expectations change the outcome

  • Jewels

    Jewels

    10 दिन पहले

    What was that song playing when John was introduced?

  • Francisco Rendón

    Francisco Rendón

    10 दिन पहले

    This is so damn cute...

  • someguywhocanfly

    someguywhocanfly

    11 दिन पहले

    Is this idea about reading text with the context of the author a proper book nerd thing? Because I'm pretty sure 95% of the books I've read were from authors I'd never heard of/didn't know anything about, and still don't. I wouldn't always even read the author's name, so gender wasn't even in my head as I was reading.

  • Mysterious Kitten

    Mysterious Kitten

    12 दिन पहले

    I just had a flashback to a HUGE discourse the Warrior Cats fandom had last year.
    Basically one of the authors said she liked to think about a certain cat's eye color as blue, but the books said plenty of times that her eyes were green. (The books are written by multiple people)
    So the Wiki started banning and fighting with anyone who said her eyes were green. It created this massive argument.
    Also, this was over EYE COLOR. What a lovely fandom -_-

  • SlamBolts

    SlamBolts

    12 दिन पहले

    I love commercial Lindsay at the end. ♥

  • Emilia Smetanov

    Emilia Smetanov

    12 दिन पहले

    important men wearing turtlenecks and smoking

  • Malgarroth

    Malgarroth

    13 दिन पहले

    Great video, but you were a bit harsh on Anne Rice. Be fair, fan fiction is cringe and if the author taking ownership of those characters means that I don't have to see Lestat X Louis yaoi on my internet travels, then I'm grateful.

  • Andrew Portner

    Andrew Portner

    13 दिन पहले

    I liked the video but couldn't continue bc the jk rowling content was too cringe

  • Anuar Uribe

    Anuar Uribe

    13 दिन पहले

    That AV audio though 😐

  • Andreas Egeland

    Andreas Egeland

    13 दिन पहले

    I think the Foucault quote preceding 17:18 suggests we should ignore the author for the very purpose of creating more equal opportunity for writing or literary analysis.

  • Empyreal Denizen

    Empyreal Denizen

    13 दिन पहले

    Interesting perspective.

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    27:01 In some ways, it seems like you're looking perhaps to interpret this novel as a meta-narrative of "the death of the Author [God]". . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    25:36 In this case, the "Author's Note" is a paratext, with respect to the novel. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    24:38 The "author's intent" is important: but it's not found "outside" by asking the author, rather it is found directly embedded in the text itself (Eco). . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    24:14 "the author's brand" - a very modern take, right out of marketing ! 😄

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    23:33 Initially, it came from postmodernism in the arts. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    22:15 . . .or, for many, because they saw the movie ! 😄

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    20:42 This has been going on at least since Poe (see: Six Walks). . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    18:50 🤔 Well, that would get into interpretation (of the author!). . . and not addressing or interpreting the actual text itself. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    18:32 🤔 Maybe ! (maybe not.) "Paratext" has usually referred to a written text, added just before or after the main text (novel). . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    17:12 Eco, at least, doesn't theorize about "equal opportunity" or "equal exposure" regarding texts. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    16:51 I don't think so, at least until recently. . .
    🤔 Maybe now that's true. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    16:10 🤔 Well. . . "Brand" has more to do with "marketing" than "authorial intent" or "paratext". . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    14:21 Many people read texts / listen to music (lyrics) without knowing the empirical author's intent, or the life & times of the author. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    13:46 If it was a "paratext", it would be in one of the books, and written by the author. . . yes ?

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    13:40 The text is what it is: regardless of what the author "thinks", or anyone else for that matter. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    11:58 This kind of ex post facto explanation is what Eco warns us of in Postscript. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    11:25 . . .and Tom Clancy, with all the dozens of books "co-written" by various authors.

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    10:21 ✅ That's true with Disney too !

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    8:11 🤔 I think he differs significantly
    from Umberto Eco. . . see especially: Postscript to The Name of the Rose. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    5:43 This is Eco's position, exactly !

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    5:03 This is a sentence that summarizes Eco's Reader Reception theory. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    4:15 "Authorial intent"is found embedded in the actual text, not found by asking the empirical author. . .

  • Christopher Knuffke

    Christopher Knuffke

    14 दिन पहले

    1:29 See: The Muse Asylum (novel). . . and Six Walks through the Fictional Woods / Umberto Eco. . .

  • Aaron Copperberg

    Aaron Copperberg

    14 दिन पहले

    I’m gonna need a copy of that Jesus dabbing clipart

  • Ean James Elmore

    Ean James Elmore

    14 दिन पहले

    How did you manage to do dated television production better than most Hollywood fabrications of that concept?

  • ynotjaxon

    ynotjaxon

    14 दिन पहले

    I know this is awhile after you made this video but I just got into your channel so sorry. While I agree that Rowling injecting authorial intent into the series after the fact is problematic, personally, without knowing about what she has said and reading the books without any influence, I honestly read Dumbledore as gay for the last 2 books. Imo, you can't even really consider him much of a character until then because I always read him as a Gandalf like character, but in functionality he's basically Harry's agent, arguing against the haters. In the Half-blood Prince you start to learn more about him and the way he sees things. However, it's deathly Hallows where he actually becomes an important character outside of politics. Anyway in the last book his whole relationship with Grindelwald just seemed romantic in nature, seeing as he would not do anything against him.

  • Geoff F.

    Geoff F.

    15 दिन पहले

    Lindsay pronounces angst with a short a sound.
    Me: That's adorable and illegal.

  • Geoff F.

    Geoff F.

    15 दिन पहले

    Maybe it's my useless English degree but I apply about four or five literary theories per book I read automatically...

  • Laura Lomeli

    Laura Lomeli

    15 दिन पहले

    The author isn't dead, and the author isn't god, the author, as all of us, is just a person. They can influence how I feel about the text, and they can make me view it differently, but they can't make me take what they say as law, and they cannot have an ultimate say in how I view their work. That's mine. That's yours.

  • Super Rittna

    Super Rittna

    15 दिन पहले

    This was a very black and white video, about if it is right or wrong with Death of the Author.

  • A stripper ho named Diamond

    A stripper ho named Diamond

    15 दिन पहले

    I think Sarah Z deserved a much more obvious shout-out within the video. Go watch Sarah Z as well, everyone! Sarah does great work, just like Lindsay.

  • Joseph Stalin

    Joseph Stalin

    15 दिन पहले

    Turtles all the way down? Is that supposed to be a Discworld reference?

  • Will Angle

    Will Angle

    16 दिन पहले

    This is why I only read books written by people whom have died long ago.

    • Christopher Knuffke

      Christopher Knuffke

      14 दिन पहले

      🤣

  • Christopher Chapman

    Christopher Chapman

    16 दिन पहले

    So the question of intimitacy is an interesting one to me. A work is written. It's good, it's bad, whatever. and someone reads it.
    I believe that to say the author is beholden to that work is false the moment that work is made. An author may choose to hold this work close to ones heart. The author may also refute the work and despise it from their very core. Both these options are valid.
    A work of art being intimate is entirely on the consumer of that work. The author has not binding to that intimatcy, and while it's true that a vast number of people may relate themselves to someone who writes a work, it is not the author's recponcibility to carry or even to respond to that.
    Binding the work to an author is to treat a work as a product. Art, by it's nature of being related to the human experiance, is personal. You can draw a picture and it is art, but to bind your name is to commercialise. Banksy fights this very concept in his recent work. J. K. Rowling wrote a work. That work spoke to the human experiance in thousands around the world. But her name only matters as a context to evaluate the work and reassess it. To ingrane her life, opinions and context beyond a further formation of ones own opinion is flawed. it takes the soul out of work and allows the audience to become a consumer.
    Swallow the work, fell and move on. Not internalise and grow. Art speaks to us. Product's feed us. To consider the author, beyond the respect one might have for them, is to falsly engage with a product. To accept the reading as writ and not really internalise the human element of the work you witness.

    And to those who would argue that they BOTH engage with the author and internalise the meaning i ask you; Are these two things one and the same. When you cried for the character, did you care about the author? Did you feel for the writer or the fiction you created?

    • Christopher Chapman

      Christopher Chapman

      16 दिन पहले

      Though I must say to remove context is wrong. The auther matters in so much as the time and reality that INFORMED the work might matter. e.g. a racial play written by a person of another race. but it does not inform the internalised conversation nor should it have any other baring in the realm of art. Comercials and consumables sure. But not art.

  • niftysheep

    niftysheep

    16 दिन पहले

    Rowling is super problematic, especially by being a Terf.

  • cass cass

    cass cass

    21 दिन पहले

    My nine-year-old Nephew just broke down death of the author very simply by comparing it to the argument of Jif vs GIf

  • Anna Mattos

    Anna Mattos

    21 दिन पहले

    "A text taken out of its context is a pretext for heresy."

    • Christopher Knuffke

      Christopher Knuffke

      13 दिन पहले

      @Anna Mattos 🤔. . . That's where we disagree, re: fiction. . . Sometimes those things play a part, sometimes not at all. . .

    • Anna Mattos

      Anna Mattos

      13 दिन पहले

      @Christopher Knuffke I partially agree. The text is, indeed, a substantial part of the context. However, the historical moment and the culture in which the text is created, the original language it is written in, the genre it belongs to, the audience it is supposed to reach, the author's background, all of this should be considered as broader context, in my opinion. Try reading the Gilgamesh as if it had been written yesterday by a journalist and you'll see what you get into.

    • Christopher Knuffke

      Christopher Knuffke

      13 दिन पहले

      @Anna Mattos Ok 🙂 Still, the context of the story is the text. . . that's what's normative. . .

    • Anna Mattos

      Anna Mattos

      13 दिन पहले

      @Christopher Knuffke You're right, it isn't. But it translates an important principle. Speaking as a Christian, that's what the devil did when he tempted Jesus in the desert: he used Scripture out of its context to be intentionally misleading. So we have been familiar with the concept for at least 2000 years and we know what it can be used for.

    • Christopher Knuffke

      Christopher Knuffke

      14 दिन पहले

      🤣 This isn't dogma ! 🤣

  • ArgonTheAware

    ArgonTheAware

    23 दिन पहले

    But what about the trope where the author explicitly write himself as a character in the text? What does that do to the "paratext" and what about the differences of the author character and the author himself? Is the author character just another aspect of the whole author? https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RageAgainstTheAuthor

  • James Lambert

    James Lambert

    23 दिन पहले

    Dear Lindsay, I am only really commenting to say 'Thank You'. My name is James (on Facebook as James Patrick lambert - the dark haired one - that's a description, not a nomenclature (Dark Wizard/ Lord stamps his staff - "Find me THE DARK HAIRED ONE, if it helps, his actual name is James lambert"). Apologies for my digression, I am a Historian from Suffolk, England by trade (and passion) and a film nut, also by passion, oh, and a complete literature loon (Which may, or may not, have been covered by my being a historian). I absolutely love your work, it is so refreshing, honest, empathetic (in that, you never talk down to your audience). Anyway, really I just wanted to say a very quick thank you, and look me up on facebook if you like/have time.
    Best Wishes,
    James,
    Ps- I just finished watching 'The Alienist' which I adored. I know it's very 'Holmes/ Watson' but still, the great acting (I would expect nothing less with Daniel Bruhl, Dakota Fanning, and Luke Evans as the co-leads). It's now proudly strutted it's way in to, my years top 3 'Chernobyl' (my 'wonder' at the artistry of all involved, and the emotion they awoke within me, managed to outweigh my 'Get out of my way, I'm a Historian! Nothing to see here - Ness). 'The Terror' - just a beautiful piece of Shelley/ Stoker, even Lovecraftian horror, with another wonderous cast, and not bad historical details, the narrative conceit apart of course (I know, I struggle with Historical detail, but I promise, I am getting much better, and am almost cured of the affliction). Sorry 'Mindhunter' second series, you've been pushed down...a bit. I know, it hurts now, it's not you, it's me.
    All the best, Lindsay, apologies for 'Going on'.

  • Bruce Tucker

    Bruce Tucker

    27 दिन पहले

    Since you're also a LotR fan, I'd be curious how you compare and contrast these ideas to Tolkien's conception of literature as sub-creation.
    Tolkien also makes an interesting (to me, anyway) case for this discussion because with his published works there often *are* answers that are outside the published text, because his published texts only comprised a small fraction of what he actually wrote on the subject. These aren't arbitrary things he wrote to change how people thought about the published work, the way Rowling's revelations on Dumbledore work, they were an integrated part of a much larger text from which the published work was extracted (often against Tolkien's will - he very much wanted the Silmarillion to be published along with LotR, but sadly didn't live to see that happen.
    Another way of putting this is, what exactly comprises the text? Is each Harry Potter novel a distinct and complete work without relation to the others, so that nothing we learn in the 7th book should influence how we read the 1st? Does the fact that it is a published work make it different from blog posts or offhand comments by the author? And does it matter whether the 7th volume has been written at the time the 1st is read? Is _Philosopher's Stone_ a different text today than it was in 1997?

    • Tapware

      Tapware

      24 दिन पहले

      Tucker, I can't speak for Linsay, but, it sounds like you do not fully comprehend the impact of death of the author. Even the very term "text" is chosen and not "book" or "novel". A text is ever open while a book is fixed. Or more plainly the Philosopher's Stone is the same physical text today as it was in 97, however, it carries no more universally shared meaning now than it did in 97; according to a post-structuralist view. The death of the author is the death of any truth claim on meaning in a text, or any shared linguistic sign really.

  • Kamelstrejk

    Kamelstrejk

    28 दिन पहले

    Lindsay taking on Foucault, be like "The world isn't perfect, Miíííchelll", and I be like, "Lindsay, you're my Optimus Prime"